WORDS

Drawing in Contemporary Representation

Viewing recent work from Peter Goche “The Map and its Porcelain Goat”

By: Mike Nesbit

 

“To finish a work? To Finish a picture?  What nonsense!  To finish it means to be through with it, to kill it, to rid it of its soul, to give it its final blow the coup de grace for the painter as well as for the picture.”

-Pablo Picasso

 

With the growing palette of techniques for drawing within representation, drawing has extended itself far beyond any traditional notions of the two-dimensional plane.  More times than not drawing gets confused with nostalgia and we are confronted with morbid interpretations of a dying technique.  However, it’s becoming more apparent, due to increasing “upgrades” in contemporary representation via digital platforms that our perception of drawing is becoming increasingly mis-understood.  The simple act of drawing, placing pencil on paper can be compared quite literally with the virtual digital representation of that pencil on paper.  Our current technical ability to virtually represent our physical environment, brings into question… what is the extent of drawing?  As our digital techniques become ever more sophisticated in their capacity for “users” to represent the natural environment, a critical question comes to mind.  If the digital representation of our environment can be considered a drawing, then shouldn’t our natural environment be considered a drawing as well?  A theoretical understanding that the further we move forward through technical complexity the closer we get to equality within seemingly primitive forms of representation, our natural environment.  Something quite ironic … as our perception of the natural environment, which we tend to take for granted, is exponentially more complex than anything we could represent.  That being said … with the concept in mind of natural environment being drawing, Peter Goche’s exhibit, “The Map and its Porcelain Goat” becomes quite relevant as a contemporary form of representation.

 

To hear Goche describe the landscape is to hear Goche describe a drawing.  To hear Goche describe pulling a piece of lead from the soil with a backhoe, that has been in a state of finish for the past 100 years, is to hear Goche describe technique within drawing.  For Goche, drawing has no hierarchy and has no difference, whether natural or artificial.   For Goche, drawing doesn’t stop or start, for Goche everything is drawing.  To discover the carcass of a goat in the landscape or to mis-represent that object through digital representation, is merely a “finish” conversation within drawing.  This contemporary outlook on drawing and the notion of everything is drawing, brings with it relevant opportunities within representation.  The “similar” approach vs the “difference” approach, ironically lends itself to more unexpected results within our current disciplinary understanding of technique and representation.  Through Goche’s perception of drawing, representation is never dead, it’s in a state of constant flux. 

 

Drawing of Goat

 

fruitful goat grazed the drawing

Lead buried in soil

tired goat lies down

Lead finished in soil

goat buried in drawing

fruitful blanket pulled from landscape

fruitful carcass pulled from soil

drawing of Goat and Lead

 

  goat buried in drawing

goat buried in drawing

  fruitful blanket pulled from landscape

fruitful blanket pulled from landscape

  fruitful carcass pulled from soil

fruitful carcass pulled from soil

  drawing of Goat and Lead

drawing of Goat and Lead